March marks the 31st annual Contemporary Art Month in San Antonio.  What began as a grassroots event at Blue Star Contemporary in 1986 has grown into a month-long celebration of San Antonio’s artists, museums, galleries and studios.  Contemporary Art Month (CAM), an independent, volunteer-run nonprofit established in 2003, manages the calendar and promotion for the month.  CAM sponsors several free, educational programs during the month for the public, as well as an open call for artists.

Read more: Contemporary Art Month 2017

March is Contemporary Art Month!  The King William Association is participating this year by inviting local artist A.J. Rodriguez to display some of his paintings in our office.  The exhibit will be on view from February 20 through mid-April.  There will be a “Meet the Artist” reception on Thursday, April 6 from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. 

I recently met A.J. at Radius Center where his paintings were on exhibit.  Over lunch at Pharm Table at the Center, we got acquainted and he shared his artistic journey with me.  A.J. gave me a guided tour of his paintings, explaining his technique using acrylic paint in vibrant colors in the series he has named “Figuras.” 

Read more: Art Exhibit at KWA Office featuring A.J. Rodriguez

2nd Annual Mockingbird Fest, March 4, 12:00-5:00 p.m.

A FREE fun filled festival of tasting, moving and discovering things that make Texas great – only at Hemisfair!  Educational activities will teach state history, natural wonders and cultural traditions while local chefs and brewers will serve up the flavors Texans love most.  Come enjoy arts, crafts, music and more. Move, Taste & Discover the Best of Texas!

Southtown Cinema, Saturday Evenings March-May

Southtown Cinema is a free community movie series in Yanaguana Garden at Hemisfair. Movie screenings begin at sundown, usually around 7:00 p.m, twice a month on Saturdays, weather permitting. Southtown Cinema is a free event, brought to you by Slab Cinema, Carvana and Gold’s Gym. Thanks to our sponsors for keeping movies at Hemisfair free and fun for the community! 

  • 3/11 – Back to the Future
    featuring pre-movie music from Divine Atoms
  • 3/25 – Nacho Libre
  • 4/08  Cars
  • 4/22 – Dodgeball
  • 5/13 – Ferris Bueller's Day Off
  • 5/27 – The Bad News Bears (2005)

Union Pacific has been contacted by the City regarding the increase in train horn noise and concerns from the neighborhoods regarding the noise.

The Notice of Intent (NOI) for the Quiet Zone was submitted in the fall of last year.  The City received comments from Union Pacific and is now addressing access issues for properties adjacent to the track.  COSA Senior Transportation Engineer-Traffic Engineering Manager Bianca Thorpe is coordinating with those property owners to come up with a solution.  Once that is completed, Notice of Establishment (NOE) will be sent for final approval by UPRR and Federal Railway Administration.  For further information, contact Ms. Thorpe in the Transportation & Capital Improvements department at 207-1484.  

The average age of a plumber in the United States is 55.  That fact alone seems to indicate that this is a moribund trade populated by persons who probably don’t fit under sinks as well as they once did.

A leak under my kitchen sink, escaping the confines of the little pail I had placed under it, necessitated a service call that was answered by someone half the age of the aforementioned fact.  He had an even younger helper with him.  He introduced himself as David and asked if he could see the basement.  “What does the basement have to do with the kitchen?” I asked, rather thoughtlessly.  “Everything – its where the service lines and drains are, most likely, and I’ll bet the original connections are all iron pipe,” he replied tactfully. 

Read more: City Lights: March 2017

Ethel Pedraza, a King William resident for many years, is an inveterate traveler with an adventurous spirit.  She was born in Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico.  Growing up she traveled regularly with her parents, Manuelita & Ruperto, and sister, Norma, within Mexico and to the U.S.  Her dad, who learned English well while studying in San Antonio, was dismayed that she had forgotten the English that she had been learning.  This wouldn’t do, so he instructed her to listen to WOAI A.M. news radio and report to him what the news was about.  This was a powerful radio station that they listened to in Mexico.  He also expected her to make As in history to be better prepared for eventual U.S. citizenship.  

Read more: Ethel Pedraza: Traveling Through Life

 

The following neighbors recently joined the Board to complete the terms of members who had resigned: 

Shawn Campbell

My husband Jim and I have lived in King William for five years now and love it.  We are native Texans and have lived our married lives in Houston, Rockwall and Austin with a 10-year period in Washington, D.C.  Our two sons are grown, out of the house and gainfully employed.  We love being empty nesters.  We moved to King William for the diversity, walkability, uniqueness of the neighborhood and access to the San Antonio River.  I agreed to be on the board to contribute.  I found myself attending some of the HDRC meetings to figure out what was going on.  This is a great opportunity to be informed and have an impact on changes that will continue to make KW a vibrant neighborhood while maintaining its historic nature.  I am currently on the 50th Year Anniversary Committee and the Architectural Advisory Committee.  

Shelley Galbraith

Shelley and Peter Galbraith were drawn to King William in 2012 by friends to purchase and renovate the Nix House on King William Street.  (After 20 years in San Antonio, it was about time!)  Shelley works in digital marketing for HOLT CAT from her home office, and serves on the KWA board as a way to give back to the community.  She also serves on executive board of the San Antonio Tennis Association.

Dear Friends in King William,

Last month, after a busy fall of Bond Committee meetings and community input, my City Council colleagues and I unanimously voted to approve the slate of projects the City staff and the Bond Committees presented to Council.  I felt the process was inclusive and many voices were heard, considered, and incorporated.  I am a proponent of inclusivity and I always encourage the community to participate in the processes of government.  To that end, I hosted three Bond Block Parties in various parts of the district to ensure there were multiple opportunities to meet the District 1 Bond Committee members to propose and discuss projects important to neighborhoods.

Read more: Message from the Councilman

STADCast is a weekly podcast hosted by Joe Turner of JTP210 Photography and Burgundy Woods of Style Lush TV.  Together, the two Southtowners highlight information about the Southtown Arts District and its five neighborhoods: Lone Star, King William, Lavaca, Roosevelt and Collins Garden.  The duo also informs listeners about events around the city, the Spurs, food talk and other fun “chitter chatter” highlighting local creatives and what they have going on.

Read more: STADCast Debuts

As we begin the year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the King William Association (KWA), it is appropriate to pay tribute to those who worked tirelessly to assure the preservation and restoration of the neighborhood we know today.  By the time the first meeting of the KWA was held on October 4, 1967, residents had already been working for 20 years to protect the place many of their families had called home since the 1800s.  

Concerned about the decline of the neighborhood, residents formed the King William Area Conservation Association (KWACA) in March 1947.  The group included descendants of founding residents — the James, Groos, Steves, Pancoast and Guenther families — as well as more recent arrivals.  At a party in their honor, new residents Della Gething and her daughter Margaret suggested forming an organization to preserve the “unique charms and historic values of King William Street.” 

Read more: Celebrating Our 50th Birthday!

I was rummaging in my massively disorganized bookcases and a battered sketchbook fell out, and open, on the floor. It was the sketchbook I carried as a 21 year old art history student at the University of Siena. The page was dated February 22nd, the day of Carnevale, the Italian answer to Mardi Gras. On that long-ago night I was at the art student’s ball at the Palazzo Chigi-Saracini, the seat of Siena’s famous music school. I’d been trying to catch the eye of a reddish-blonde with almond shaped green eyes, to little avail. Most of the crowd was in the Palazzo’s grand ballroom, a rococo confection of crème and gilt plaster swirls and mirrored doors catching the flickering light of its enormous chandeliers. In the courtyard just outside was a clock set on a stone well head, about to play its part in the evening’s ritual of turning its hands back from midnight to postpone the arrival of the first day of Lent.

Read more: City Lights: February 2017

 

This article is inspired by past issues of the King Association newsletter, beginning in November 1967.  Its purpose is to inform newer neighbors and remind those who have been here awhile of how the King William Area has evolved through the years.

References and comments are from those issues containing “news” items that seem, to this writer, to show the development of the King William neighborhood or merely to show how some things are unique to an historic district. The series starts with comments taken from the November 1967 newsletter about the first King William Association meeting held in October 1967.  Articles will continue, but will not in every issue of the newsletter. 

November 1967 issue – The first meeting of the King William Association was held in October 1967.  It was attended by people who cared very much for the future of the area and who were committed to the idea of getting together to accomplish that which no one could ever accomplish alone.  Individual dues were $2 a year and $5 for businesses or organizations.  Those joining by January 1, 1968, would be considered Charter Members of the Association.

December 1967 issue – The City Director of Planning made a presentation at the monthly meeting concerning what the addition of historic zoning would mean for property owners.  

Read more: Old News: February 2017

Brackenridge High School, at the southern edge of the King William neighborhood on Eagleland Drive, is 100 years old this year. Since the KWA will celebrate its 50th year in 2017, it seems appropriate to tell something about the school that has been a part of that history.

The original three story red brick building was replaced by the present structure in the 1970s, and the campus expanded to take in about five blocks of homes on the edge of the neighborhood. A picture of the original school building is shown in full article. It was designed by well-known architect Alfred Giles.

The school was named for George Washington Brackenridge, born in Warwich County, Indiana. At the end of the Civil War, Brackenridge moved to San Antonio where he started the San Antonio National Bank. In addition, he was president of the San Antonio Water Works, director of the...

Read more: Happy Birthday, Brack!

Photographer Al Rendon is photographing King William residences for our revision of Mary Burkholder’s book, The King William Area, to be published in 2017. He started taking pictures in November and will continue into spring 2017.

Different homes will be shot at different times of day to catch the best light. Also, some homes look better in the evening with exterior lights on, others are better in the full light of day, sometimes interior lights should be on or off. Automobiles need to be out of sight.

Mr. Rendon’s assistant will call to make an appointment before he photographs your property. He is an expert at making our historic homes look their best, so please try to “stage” your home as he suggests.

Most of the homes will be photographed after the Christmas season, but please contact Mr. Rendon at (210) 288-4900 or alrendon@ satx.rr.com if you would like your home photographed without holiday decorations.

Feel free to contact me at 224-9756 or jnmsimpson@hotmail. com if you have questions. Thank you for helping the committee with this project! - Jessie Simpson Burkholder Book Chair

We lost another long-time resident on October 14, when Karine Berghauser passed away after a short illness. Friends and neighbors recalled how vibrant, smart, generous and witty Karine was. Many described her as a connector of interesting people and beautiful things. She supported the arts, education and children, often connecting them to her world in ways startling and inspiring. In many ways, Karine embodied the best of King William.

Karine was born on September 29, 1954 in Wiesbaden, Germany, to Irmgard Berghauser and Gilbert Davila. The family moved to San Antonio in 1956. While in high school, Karine discovered music and acted on the stage. After graduating from Churchill High School in 1973, she performed at the Melodrama Theater in Hemisfair until moving on to study acting and modern dance at Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri. She later moved to Los Angeles and then New York where she performed in live theatre and film.

Karine returned to San Antonio after marrying Bart Nichols (an accomplished dentist and musician), and they settled in King William. Their daughter Sydney was born in 1983. Karine and Bart purchased the Albert Carl Moye House at 524 King William Street in 1986, where they lived for more than 20 years.

Karine was active in our community, hosting dinners remembered for their tasteful creativity and beautiful surroundings. She chaired the parade for several years, joining it with her own blend of wit and charm. Many remembered her “duchess themes” with great fondness.

But life wasn’t just fun and games for Karine. When Sydney was older, she went back to school, earning a doctor of psychology from Our Lady of the Lake University, where she later taught as an adjunct professor. Her dissertation focused on the resiliency of same-sex parented families. Karine also championed troubled youth by serving as a...

Read more: Karine Berghauser 1954-2016

Both Regina Moya’s writing and her life are a blend of two cultures. Her childhood in Mexico City was interrupted by a period of living in Philadelphia from the age of two to six. This was the perfect age to become fluent in both Spanish and English, and to absorb some of the culture of America. Fast forward to 2003, and a six-month to one-year project in San Antonio has turned into 13 years to date. Now she is happily ensconced in her King William home with her husband, Juan Fernandez, and their three children.

Growing up, it fell to Regina, the second of five children and one of 30 grandchildren, to organize the holiday posadas created to entertain their family. She used her rich imagination to write the dialogue, full of humor and often containing parodies of her elders. Regina went on to study communication and to earn a Masters degree in literature and creative writing. She wrote her first novel when she was 20 years old. She announced to her family that she had written it, but was not going to let them read it yet. She registered it in Mexico, but did not pursue publishing it.

Three years later, at her wedding, her father surprised her by announcing a secret about Regina that he was going to reveal. While packing up her belongings for the move to her new home, her parents found the manuscript she had hidden. They really liked the story. To her great surprise, they found a publisher for the book, and her father presented the printed Memorias de dos mujeres mexicanas to her at the reception. She told me that she read it over and over during her honeymoon and told herself that she needed to write.

Regina began to have an interest in children’s literature. She took classes to learn illustrating as well as painting. She was fortunate to meet Lina Cuartas, a children’s book author and illustrator who was born in Columbia but now lives in San Antonio. Lina took Regina under her wing and taught her illustration. Regina also took classes at the Southwest School of Art and at Gemini Ink. While perfecting her skills, she participated in the Writers in Communities (WIC) program sponsored by Gemini Ink. She was able to teach writing and painting to migrant children in detention, to kids in juvenile detention, to high school dropouts and to incarcerated, pregnant moms, among others.

After a 10-year break from novel writing, Regina set herself a deadline to start a book. It was just before...

Read more: El Dia del Guajolote/Turkey Day

You have probably seen some flags flying on a lot of the old houses in King William and perhaps you wondered, what’s the story about these flags? The flag is blue and orange and yellow and has 100 printed on it. I talked to Mike Schroeder, KW resident and architect, who designed the flag in 1991, which was the 100th year of San Antonio’s Fiesta Celebration.

Since 1968, the King William Fair has been a part of the annual Fiesta occurring each April. Dee Dee Polk was the Fair Chairperson in 1991. She and her committee thought it would be a good idea for KWA to honor the 100-year tradition of Fiesta. Someone suggested a flag and Dee Dee approached Mike about creating a design. He made some sketches incorporating elements and colors that would be eye-catching.

The resulting design has a suggestion of unfolding panels...

Read more: The Story Behind the KWA 100 Year Flag

Over 16 neighbors have taken advantage of the City’s cost-share program and KWA Sidewalk reimbursement program to get new sidewalks.

(See details in the July KWA Newsletter.)

City Council has approved the program for the 2017 budget year, so more funding is available.

Call 311 to get your quote, but remember to have the inspector come out to give the actual quote as it is usually lower than the $60/ linear foot quoted by 311.

King William Fair proceeds fund this project. Take advantage today!

So far KWA has reimbursed over $5,900 for the five repaired sidewalks.

-Cherise Bell

It finally looks a little more like winter with gray skies and bare branches, but this seems like another year without the temperatures to match.

My house is bristling with chimneys so you’d imagine it would be producing curling plumes of wood smoke suitable for a Currier and Ives Christmas Card.

They ring the house like towers on top of a fortress from the Middle Ages. The largest of them corbels out from its base, if I squint it reminds me of the silhouette of the Torre del Mangia in Siena or the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence.

The defending army at these ramparts turns out to be squirrels hurling pecan shells rather than guardsmen flinging boiling oil or rocks. It’s still my castle, just the same.

And there is no smoke pouring forth, because the house doesn’t have a single fireplace. These chimneys once served as the flues for a collection of coal burning stoves, one in the corner of every room. They are all capped with tin hats now, barring the rodent army from the interior of the house.

Shortly after I bought the house I found myself sitting at a desk in the County Tax Appraiser’s Office...

Read more: City Lights: December 2016

A series of limited edition holiday ornaments has been created as part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration of the King William Association.

Images are from the illustrated book “Caroline Shelton Paints King William Street San Antonio Texas.”

Each year, a different home will be featured on these collectible ornaments.

The Ike West house is the first, and will be available for $10 at the Home Tour and Holiday Fair in King William Park on December 3.

Look for more official King William Association merchandise at our booth in King William Park near the corner of King William Street and Turner Street.

See you there!

According to the LOCAL Community News “San Antonio budgets about $1.2 million a year for graffiti abatement. A 15-member team labors six days a week, aided by 2,500 volunteers.” Graffiti includes painting, glass etching, “slaps” and stickers.

Although the motivations behind tagging and graffiti vary, experts agree it is important to clean or remove the tagging immediately. A clean building, sign, electrical box, or wall sends the message that vandalism is not appropriate in our neighborhood. Help keep our neighborhood clean by volunteering to be a block captain. Also, the KWA office has graffiti wipes that easily clean paint off of metal – just come by the office to pick some up. Together we can help keep King William clean. - Cherise Bell

The KWA Architectural Advisory Committee (AAC) is comprised of association residents – including licensed architects – who volunteer their time to evaluate cases that are presented to the City of San Antonio Historic and Design Review Commission (HDRC), for discussion and recommendation. Any property owner who desires to make changes to the exterior of their property, or to their site (front, side or back yard), must make application to the HDRC. This application process is handled through the City’s Office of Historic Preservation (OHP). Once the OHP staff reviews the case (project request), they make a staff recommendation, and then forward the King William neighborhood cases (and others that have an impact on the neighborhood) to the AAC, so that our neighborhood can weigh in and provide commentary to the HDRC as part of the public input process.

Although most of the cases that are reviewed include additions, renovations, requests to change out windows (which are not often approved), fence installations, landscaping and site improvements (walkways, driveways, etc.), new roofing, and material replacements, more recently, there have been many cases that include requests to install solar panels, understandably due to the CPS rebates that are being offered. As the KWA committee that is...

Read more: Solar Panel Installations in the King William Historic District: Not all structures are good...

KWA NNO organizers Josie Garcia, Ethel Pedraza and Nelda Burch, with Sheldon Shea from the Texas Masonic Lodge #8 AF & AM and our neighborhood fire fighters from Station #7

Big red fire engine, handsome fire fighters, and Sparky the Fire dog along with his best friend McGruff came together to take a bite out of crime the evening of October 4. King William celebrated NNO in style, joined by Texas Lodge #8. These gentlemen grilled over 100 hotdogs with all the trimmings, add a six-foot sub and you’ve got the makings of a celebration. Mr. Ramos with KONO kept those oldies but goodies coming while everyone enjoyed visiting with neighbors and friends. Thanks to all who came out and enjoyed a lovely evening.

KWA board member Patty Garcia (standing) with neighbors Roger Martines, Mari Feist and Henry Botello

A special thanks to Sheldon Shed, NNO organizer for Texas Lodge #8 and to the KWA Social Committee for all their time and efforts in organizing this event. We also want to thank everyone who showed their support of the SA Food Bank by bringing a jar of peanut butter. We collected 14 jars and a cash donation! This is awesome! Thank you! - Josie Garcia

Past President Harry Shafer, KWA ED Cherise Bell, current KWA President Chris Price and Cheryl Bell

 

You still have a chance to view Toro’s delightful “Westi Lost in the Park” series of colorful paintings at the offices of King William Association. Toro is a local artist and native Texan with a studio at Lonestar Art Space. After attending the San Antonio Art Institute in the 1990s, he was encouraged by his mentor, Linda Pace, to travel abroad. Toro studied in the Netherlands and traveled to Jerusalem.

Once home and working on his paintings, Toro began to experiment with homemade pigments. He was searching for a certain quality with an aluminum effect. His frustration in finding what he was searching for led him to mix different organic and inorganic items into paints. He started by cutting up aluminum cans with pliers. The pieces were not fine enough and this led him to using a coffee grinder to make a finer grade. Once he learned how to make his own paint, he found a mill in Houston to make his required ingredient.

Toro continued to experiment with adding flower petals, seeds, crushed chipotle peppers and bee pollen to his pigments. He finally achieved the qualities that he was looking for. These paints are used with great effect in his paintings. Plan to stop by during office hours to see his colorful expressions before the exhibit ends. - Nora Peterson